Skip 
Navigation Link
Homosexuality & Bisexuality
Resources
Basic InformationLatest NewsQuestions and AnswersLinksBook ReviewsSelf-Help Groups
Related Topics

Family & Relationship Issues

by Katherine E. Kreuter
Rising Tide Press, 2000
Review by Susan K. Wingate on Jul 24th 2002

The Deposition

            This is a Lesbian novel. Paris in the springtime is the backdrop for this story.  G.B. one of the main characters, is the mastermind behind the scheme to steal one of Monet’s famous paintings, with the help of an “aging quartet of French feminists” and her artist/lover.  Adding more mayhem in the midst of this scheming, G.B. undertakes the writing of a book that ultimately becomes her undoing.

            Truthfully, this was a difficult book to engage me as an avid reader.  While I have had the privilege and pleasure to travel to Paris on vacation, I was put off by the author’s assumption that the average reader would know enough of the French language to understand the references to the places she mentions and of the phrases used throughout the book.  I felt frustrated weeding through what felt like a “forced tour” of Paris to focus on the story.

            G.B. is not a very likable character. She is a very egotistical intellect and a fraud.  She spends most of her time convincing others that she is in charge, a persona she seems to have come bay honestly through her childhood.  Does the saying what goes around, comes around, mean anything?  This is a lesson she learns the hard way.

Simone, the artist/lover, becomes the default heroine. She is depicted as “fragile” and not intelligent enough to hold a “real” conversation with anyone that may have more education then she does.  The irony comes into play when Simone is the one the real key to the success of the “caper”.  Of course, this detail is downplayed in a way to further her persona of “spoiled little rich girl”. She is also the one that in the end finds more of who she is and what she wants in her life, more than anyone has given her credit for.

            The last 2 chapters redeem the entire book and put everything, to include everyone into true perspective.  That alone is worth the read. As a Lesbian novel, it is neither the best I have read, nor the worst.  It is not necessarily a book I would recommend unless of course someone was looking for a book with surprise endings.

 

© 2002 Susan K. Wingate

Susan Wingate is currently working in personnel management at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. She has worked for twelve years as a chemical dependency counselor for adolescents, as well as having worked with survivors of domestic violence and sexual abuse. Her passion is to be a vehicle for creating awareness for self and others.